Monday, January 6, 2014

Watch the following video by artist, Anida Yoeu Ali.

Write 100 words or one page:
  • How and why does this film touch, move or inspire you?
  • How does it express, record, reveal or preserve?
  • How does it persuade or promote?
  • Relate your responses to the current "Islamophobia" issues being discussed (or ignored) by "Mainstream Media."

11 comments:

  1. This makes me think about how times have changed. It hasn't even been that long and people are becoming more progressive. The fact that there is a extremely popular reality show on now called the Shahs of Sunset, where they talk about the struggles of being Muslim while also getting to understand the culture fully.

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  2. Initially I thought the dialogue was a spoken word type thing but then I found out it was actual crime reports. The use of uncomfortable angles, upside down for example, and crime reports adds to the emotion of the piece. I liked the direct call to action. It left me reflecting back on my own life and if I had witnessed or even contributed to the discrimination of Muslims post 9/11.

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  3. This video was interesting, and it definitely had me engaged. The flow of the video was riveting and it felt like a hip hop video with the pace and quick jumps. At the end of the video the video I felt kind of empty because it shows how we dehumanize each other. It really hit me when we saw the montage of the different people of all different walks of the life that were wrongly accused of actions of another person.

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    Replies
    1. Agreed- especially since there are so many walks of life who face backlash and displaced upsetting behavior that stems from xenophobia.

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  4. I thought the video was very interesting and creative. I like the stylistic approach the director took when creating this project. I can identify with the creator's message in many ways. I know first hand what it is like to be a victim of racism, and it is not a great feeling. I love how this video allowed me to view racism from a different perspective. In this country I feel like racism is always viewed as white vs. black. The reality is that all ethnicities deal with racism. This video has inspired me to voice my opinion on the issues that black men and women face everyday in this country.

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  5. The experimental aspect to this video is what engaged me at first. It's not just another sad commercial with terribly dark lighting and boring shots full of statistics and numbers. It made me uncomfortable with the bright lit man and the upside down girl and the quick, choppy edits. And her voice got more and more passionate along the way and you can feel her anger. This video made me angry and I think it was intended to do so. Not to just feel sorry for all these innocent victims, but to actually react to it and take action. Anger fuels action much more than sadness.

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  6. The direct crime reports, embedded and juxtaposed with the audio, dancer, and artistic element of the imagery (human faces, 're humanizing' them) were effective in communicating her message- these are the facts, this is inhumane, unacceptable, and ridiculous. As the video progressed the speed of it increased which addressed the urgency of this issue. And the repetition of the phrase "no one tries to help" was upsetting, and provoked anger. It is angering and infuriating that nothing is done. It made me upset and the audio strengthened the powerfulness of the final product. 9/11 has resulted in so much Islamophobia and instances of humiliation, racism, discrimination, acts (whether they be micro aggressive or blatant) and literal hate crimes, and it is not acceptable and painful to look at the facts with a stark lens. Especially showing their faces- the humanness, the ridiculousness of the number of cases is embarrassing- the US has historically been racist but this is a whole new level and layer to the systematic, structured and individual racism.

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  7. Thinking outside of the time and structural constraints of the narrative documentary, 1700% Project: Mistaken for Muslim stirs up emotions we didn't know we had. Newspaper columns are read off as a list, creating an authenticity that an opinionated voice over would lose. The three stories being told, (March through downtown with body, all white dancer, and cutaways to people) show several aspects of the life of a Muslim, especially the struggle and persecution. Being brought through downtown Chicago, the artist is showcasing the body by bringing the problem to a very public forum. The cutaways to people, families, and children, helps give a face to the community, a very familiar one that we see every day. Whether these people are our students, classmates, neighbors, local store owners, or anything else, they just as equal members of community as we are.

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  8. I love how in the opening they reference the egregious injustice by the American government on Japanese Americans after the attacks at Pearl Harbor because it sets a precedent and the stage for American xenophobia post terrorist attacks from 'the other.' The Butoh dancing throughout the piece continues to symbolize this reference, as well as the ongoing suffering of Americans who are still facing extreme and violent prejudice at the hands of fellow Americans for not 'looking like' Americans. As violent as the acts the narrator describes, they are never depicted. Instead we see images of multiple and diverse Muslims, staring proudly into the camera. She isn't trying to paint them as victims, but as equals, as other Americans, just like us.

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  9. There is such a creepy element to this video that's very effective. Her voice is so haunting, and the aesthetics are strange and jumpy to create discomfort. It draws me in so well. The actual content is so heart breaking. I can't stand how violent people are, and how much hate they have in their hearts. It is so ironic how even full blood native Americans were killed in all the violence. The only thing that I don't like is that it doesn't mention the violence against actual Muslims, which is just as bad. Either way, innocent people are dying.

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